natural capital

Today is the official day of Earth Overshoot: the first day of the year our natural capital spending is in the red. This type of natural debt is far more destructive than its monetary counterpart (natural debt meaning debt owed of natural capital, not a debt that is natural – there is no such thing). […]

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If only the words “back from whence ye came” could really have magical powers and plug the mortal wound we have inflicted upon the Gulf of Mexico (and soon her bigger cousin, the Atlantic Ocean and Eastern Coastline). Whilst our human brains convince us over and over again that we are above nature, can outsmart […]

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God love the actor who stands up for the environment, but there is something a little more significant (for me at least) when if comes from Robert Redford. (Maybe because he’s one of my favorites and one of the most respectable actors in Hollywood) See his challenge to President Obama: Way to go, Mr. Redford! […]

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Decoupling Demystified

by Joshua on February 3, 2010 · 15 comments

Next time you run into a classically trained economist (happens all the time, right?) start talking with him/her about ecological limits. They might squirm a little, but probably respond as trained: with some zombie-like responses about “decoupling.” What is decoupling? Basically, it’s a concept of being able to continue growing economic output without a corresponding […]

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Growth Isn’t Possible

by Joshua on January 25, 2010 · 0 comments

The new economics foundation (nef) has released a report title Growth Isn’t Possible, which is available for free download (pdf here) or purchase in a bound copy. The low-down is simple: in order to maintain the international goal of avoiding an increase of 2°C in global temperatures from carbon emissions we must stop economic growth. […]

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A Steady State Economy will need for us to value our externalities as best we can in order to take into account every impact we have and move towards a sustainable scale. It will also require us to create policies that protect us when these externalities cannot, or should not, be factored into market forces.

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Uneconomic Growth

by Joshua on August 9, 2009 · 7 comments

“That which seems to be wealth may in verity be only the gilded index of far-reaching ruin” – John Ruskin Herman Daly is often given credit for pioneering the term “Uneconomic Growth.”  It is a key term in ecological economics and Daly has given us numerous works on the subject. What is uneconomic growth? It […]

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As we continue to fuel our all-important economic growth we begin to realize more and more that it has done all the good it can for us. In fact, it has started to become uneconomic growth; a growth that actually costs us natural capital (resources) and man-made capital (products). The costs of growth now outweigh the benefits. […]

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